Self-Guided Engineering Tour

This tour takes around 25 minutes. It starts and ends at Engineering Hall, located at 1308 West Green Street in Urbana.

Start Your Tour!

Engineering Hall

Engineering Hall

Engineering Hall houses the administrative offices for The Grainger College of Engineering and other helpful student resources. Completed way back in 1894, it's one of the oldest buildings on campus.

Where to next?

Just next door, to the west of Engineering Hall, is Everitt Lab. You'll see Everitt Lab to your left as you head north down the west edge of the Bardeen Quad.

Everrit Hall

Everitt Lab

Everitt Lab is home to our Bioengineering Department. It provides Bioengineering faculty and students with some of the best research and instructional facilities in the country. This includes our Jump Simulation Center, which the Carle Illinois College of Medicine uses to train physician innovators uniquely equipped to transform health care.

Everitt Lab is named for William L. Everitt, former dean of Grainger Engineering, who helped transform the college into a research and education powerhouse after World War II.

Where to next?

Keep heading north along the west edge of the Bardeen Quad. The building just to the north of Everitt is Talbot Lab.

Talbot Lab

Housed in Talbot Lab are the departments of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (second floor) and Aerospace Engineering (third floor). This building was built around the tension and compression testing machine located in the basement.

Who knew?

The basement's testing facility can apply three million pounds of force of either tension or compression. The load frame is 50 feet high and weighs 200,000 pounds.

Where to next?

Head north along the west edge of the Bardeen Quad until you hit Springfield Avenue. Cross the street and continue north past Kenney Gym. The next building off to the west will be the Micro and Nanotechnology Building.

Micro and Nanotechnology Lab

Micro & Nanotechnology Lab

One of the nation's largest and most sophisticated university-based facilities for semiconductor, nanotechnology, and biotechnology research, this building contains over 8,000 square feet for clean room laboratories and state-of-the-art, ultra-high-speed optical and electrical device and circuit measurements.

Where to next?

Just north of the Micro and Nanotechnology Lab is the Electrical and Computer Engineering Building. Head there next.

Electrical and Computer Engineering Building

Electrical & Computer Engineering Building

This state-of-the-art building was created with the goal of net-zero energy use, meaning that it supplies all of its own energy. It provides the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering with approximately 230,000 square feet of labs, classrooms, and facilities and focuses on student learning spaces.

Where to next?

Adjacent and to the north of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Building is Beckman Institute, the next stop on your tour.

Beckman Institute

Beckman Institute

Beckman Institute was made possible by a generous gift from UIUC alumnus Arnold O. Beckman and his wife, Mabel. Since 1989, Beckman has been one of the top interdisciplinary research facilities in the world devoted to leading-edge research in the physical sciences, computation, engineering, biology, behavior, cognition, and neuroscience. The institute is named after Arnold Beckman, who founded Beckman Instruments and invented the first pH meter.

In addition, Beckman has two exhibits on the main floor that showcase the history and conception of the facility. The first exhibit, located in the rotunda, highlights the life of Beckman. He received a bachelor's degree in Chemical Engineering in 1922 and a master's degree in Physical Chemistry in 1923. The second exhibit, located in the atrium, displays various instruments designed by Beckman to further advance the fields of science and technology.

Where to next?

Now it's time to head back south. The building just southeast of Beckman is the Computer Systems and Research Lab.

Computer Systems & Research Lab

This building houses the Coordinate Science Laboratory, where research topics include advanced circuit design, supercomputing, communications, and robotics. In addition, the National Center for Supercomputing Applications and the Center for Supercomputing Research and Development are both housed here.

Where to next?

Head south to the building next door to the Computer Systems and Research Lab. This is Newmark Lab.

Newmark Lab

Named after Nathan Newmark, who pioneered earthquake resistant buildings here on campus, this building houses the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the Yeh Student Center, donated by M.T. Geoffrey Yeh. Yeh graduated in 1953 and continued his success as chairman of a large construction and holding company in Shanghai. The Yeh Student Center includes classrooms, conference rooms, and student study space.

Who knew?

Newmark houses Crane Bay, the largest lab on campus. It includes 40-ton and 20-ton cranes, as well as an earthquake tester. The concrete canoes mounted on the wall inside of Crane Bay are part of an annual student design project. Students from any discipline help to design, build, and race the canoes at a regional competition.

Where to next?

Keep heading south. The next building is the Digital Computer Lab.

Digital Computer Lab

Digital Computer Lab

This lab was completed in 1989 and constructed around an existing building whose outer walls are visible from inside. The original building held ILLIAC I, one of the world's first supercomputers. The Digital Computer Lab currently houses offices for the Engineering Career Services Center, the Department of Bioengineering, and Technology Services.

Where to next?

Just south of the Digital Computer Lab, across Springfield Avenue, is Grainger Engineering Library. Head there next.

Grainger Library

Grainger Engineering Library

This is the largest and most technologically advanced engineering library in the U.S., and it attracts award-winning faculty from around the world. It has an engineering workstation lab in the basement, reference and resource desks on the main floor, study areas on the second and third floors, and conference and study rooms on the fourth floor.

Who knew?

Located in the basement of Grainger is an engineering workstation lab available for use by Grainger Engineering students. This lab is just one of eight workstation labs on the Engineering Campus open to students. They have the most up-to-date design software you'll need for your design classes.

Where to next?

Head south from Grainger back to the Bardeen Quad, taking some time out to enjoy the view!

Bardeen Quad

Bardeen Quad

Otherwise known as the Engineering Quad, the Bardeen Quad is named after John Bardeen, who was a professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering at the university. Bardeen is the only person to have won the Nobel Prize twice in the same field (Physics). He won the prize in 1956 for the invention of the transistor and the second time in 1972 for the theory of superconductivity.

Who knew?

Boneyard Creek, running alongside Bardeen Quad, serves as a research lab of sorts. All of the storm water in the university area drains into Boneyard, and data is collected from the drainage system and studied by a group in Environmental Engineering. One professor actually teaches a class once each semester while standing in Boneyard Creek!

Where to next?

Head toward the building directly east of the Bardeen Quad. This is the Mechanical Engineering Lab.

Mechanical Engineering Lab

Mechanical Engineering Lab

The Mechanical Engineering Lab originally opened in 1905 and underwent extensive modernization in the early 2000s. It includes several great features—the John Deere Pavilion, the Ford Design and Manufacturing Lab, the McGinnis Studios, the Rosenthal Galleries, and a third-floor skylight. Inside you can view Stereolithography, the 3D layering of simple objects, and a display by the EcoIllini, who design prototype vehicles using alternative fuel.

Where to next?

Proceed to the building south of the Mechanical Engineering Lab. This is the Material Science and Engineering Building.

Material Science & Engineering Building

This building houses the Material Science and Engineering Department. It's one of the largest departments of its kind in the nation and nationally ranked for its undergraduate studies. Material Science and Engineering was created from Metallurgy and Ceramics Engineering.

Where to next?

This was your very last stop. You're one building to the east of Engineering Hall, where you started. We hope you enjoyed the tour!

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